70s Geologist, Debbil Maysong, wants his pencils back

Debbil joking with his CFO, Mirman Elu
Debbil joking with his CFO, Mirman Elu

CALGARY, Alberta – Gates, Jobs, Page, Brin, and Zuckerberg. These people are a quick list of huge success at the hands of computer tech in recent years, as technology has soared to the forefront of everything we do at home and at work.

Computers have altered the way we process and deal with massive amounts of information to the point that less data input is needed, yet the results achieved are more accurate than ever before.  Until now, computers and high tech software have been graciously accepted by every corporation looking to grow both their knowledge base and share price.  But the former owner of Duster Energy, Debbil Maysong, wants his pencils back.

Debbil Maysong made his entrance into the world of geology in the late 1960s, working as an explorationist until he was granted the honour of joining APEGGA and fulfilling a lifelong dream of being important.  After many years of experience mapping in analog, he joined Shall Energy and was given the use of a dedicated software package to make his maps shareable and more accurate.  Although working with Inaccumap and GeoSnoop had its benefits, Debbil always longed for the feel and expression of his old analog techniques.

I feel the old ways are still the best ways.  Mapping on a computer is like having Bill Gates touch your wife.  Like in that movie, for all the money?  It’s just not right.  I love my work and I love my maps.  The smell of freshly sharpened pencil crayons and eraser bits is better than drugs.  Every geologist knows this, so I’m staging a revolt.  My new startup, Analog Resources, will not have computers or an in house network.  We will get information manually, transcribe it to data sheets by hand, and then map the data old school.  You watch, we will be victorious! – Debbil Maysong outside Analogs offices

Although the fledgling Analog Resources has hired a very bright team that seems keen on moving forward with Mr. Maysong’s concept, doubt lingers about the workload needed to grow a startup oil and gas company with paper and pencil.

Jeb Kerry on a field trip
Jeb Kerry on a field trip

I have 2 masters degrees from U of C, one in Geology, and one in Theoretical Spatial Geometry.  I’m looking forward to giving this a whirl, but with 5 staff, it’s going to be hard work and long hours. – Jeb Kerry, senior exploration geologist at Analog

Located on the outskirts of Calgary, in a small office with low rent, Mr. Maysong’s vision of a true oil and gas exploration company is taking shape in opposition of the industry’s perception that they will fail at this venture.  Many industry insiders have commented to 2P News in interviews about the lack of common sense at Analog Resources, claiming the data bank is too large to be properly vetted the old way.

Industry insider, wishes to remain anonymous
Industry insider, who wishes to remain anonymous

Debbil is a great guy.  A genius by any measure, but this is liking trying to dig the oil sands with a spoon, by yourself.  He’s out of his depth and he’s lost his mind.  I wish him the best, but I hope he comes around soon, or he may lose everything. – Anonymous comment from a colleague at Endogenous Energy

 

 

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